Archive for the ‘brain wash’ Category

A Mac is a PC

Monday, December 1st, 2008

“Hello, I’m a Mac…but I’m also a PC.”

The use of the terms PC and Mac to differentiate computers that run the Microsoft Windows operating system between those that run Apple OS X is technically incorrect. A few years back, Mac was simply an abbreviation for Macintosh (the brand of computers made by Apple Inc.) and PC was an acronym for Personal Computer (those used in the home/office, etc.). Recently, however, these words have changed their connotations and this transformation hasn’t been accidental.


Before I speculate how or why, let’s cover some basics. Both and Microsoft and Apple Inc. are software/hardware companies:

Microsoft Corp. and Apple Inc. are the names of two software (and hardware) corporations.

Microsoft develops the popular operating system “Windows” but they don’t actually manufacture the computers that it runs on. They leave it up to other companies such as Lenovo, HP, Dell, Gateway and even Apple (after the transition from the PowerPC line of processors to the Intel chip) to make hardware that is compatible with their OS. Then these individual companies give their computers their own names (i.e. the HP Pavillion or the Gateway LT Series). So for example, as a consumer you can own a Dell Inspiron that runs Microsoft Windows (God forbid that actually be the case).


On the other hand, Apple develops the “X” operating system (OS X)* and manufactures the computers that run it. Furthermore (and unlike Microsoft) Apple doesn’t allow other companies to make computers that run their “ground-breaking” operating system — Apple handles it all. So as a consumer, you can’t for example, own an HP Pavillion that runs Apple OS X. If you want Apple’s OS you need to go get an Apple computer (which has a brand name of “Mac”).

In this regard, Apple is a monopoly; the control of their hardware and of the operating system that allows users to interact with it is very stringent. So in this case, there’s no need to identify both the kind of computer you have and which operating system it runs. The entire package is simply referred to as “a Mac.” This inseparable unification of hardware and software that Apple maintains is what I think has made a “Mac” represent much more than simply a brand name.

Equation that proves how Windows (and OS X) is not a PC.

At the same time, Apple has made efforts to practically abandoned “PC” as a label for anything about them by inaccurately using the label “PC” as an umbrella phrase to encompass everything that is not a Mac (specifically referring to computers that run Windows).


I needed to find some product information while doing some comparative shopping at Best Buy this past weekend. I used one of the iMacs on display in their “Apple Shop” to browse the Internet…lord knows I wasn’t about to ask one of the “highly trained” employees they have on the floor. As I wrapped up my investigation I was met by a girl…no, she was definitely older than just a girl…a woman, early to mid-twenties with no valid excuse for being an idiot, who came up to the iMac next to me and started petting it.

“Mmmmm. I just love these things. Don’t you?” she asked.

“Yeah, they’re nice,” I responded casually.

“No, you don’t understand,” she continued “these things are amazing. You see, I believe that Apple is going to take over the world someday and I think people should start using their computers now to get used to them because that’s how it’s going to be in the future.”

How does one respond to an opening statement like that?

“It’s just a computer,” I said.

Let’s pause here for a moment. You see, my opinion on this subject has become very apathetic in the last few years. The truth is that Windows and Macs both perform equally well, both crash, both get viruses (yes, Mac users, they do) and both have a slew of things that should be fixed; it’s how you use it that matters. I guess it’s just the opposite of the “grass being greener”…it’s more like “my grass is greener because it is what I stand on everyday.” My point is, what ever you are used to is what is better for you. Ok, enough said. Let us return to the conversation:

“I’m just as fine with a Windows machine,” I added.

“Oh,” she expressed sympathetically. “Are you not creative?”

And that’s when I walked away. No goodbye. No polite smirk. Just a turn of my head and I was on my way, contemplating the irony of her logic: we should all conform by being “Mac users.” That way, we’ll be able to express ourselves creatively in our iLives.

People tend to get distracted by the marketing bullshit and actually believe that having a Mac instantly makes you a creative individual. Following this logic, not having a Mac means you’re not creative. How shallow.

That being said, I own a Mac and am very satisfied with it. But I happen to use more than iPhoto & Safari, bitches. I like Apple’s hardware and occasionally their software as well. I love the fact that I have access to a UNIX environment and can run all my C programs through the terminal pretty much out of the box. However, I recognize that Steve Jobs is in fact mortal and that his corporation has many similarities to Microsoft—a company people are so quick to criticize.

This post is for all you people who posses Apple stickers: don’t be so quick to assume that there is only one solution people should conform to. After all, that’s what the Nazis did.

A more drastic, but fairly accurate view point.

Stupid People (Part I)

Tuesday, August 14th, 2007

Part I of what I expect to be a series of posts.

You know, there’s something that really bothers me about dumb people. I was browsing through Adobe’s site to check out the new features that the new Creative Suite offers and I ended up watching the “Feature Tour” for Dreamweaver, Illustrator, Photoshop and Indesign CS3. Did you know one of the features of Indesign is that it, and I quote, “has mouse wheel support?” “This is especially helpful when working on long documents.”

Really? What a novelty!

Oh, and don’t miss out on the awesome features of Photoshop CS3. Adobe has a good example of how you can hide and unhide a layer in their “Feature Tour” so be sure to watch the video.


No, really. The photographer that Adobe interviewed toggles the layers for a good portion of the video and says that “the new version is so easy to use and that it really has what we need.” Way to show the true power of Photoshop you moron!

People treat these new releases as if they are groundbreaking and innovative, but more often than not the new features are few and your use of the product won’t change much. The face of the product is what changes the most and people seem to think that means a whole new product. Sure, Adobe is the industry leader with their product line (don’t forget they purchased Macromedia a while back), but it doesn’t make them smarter than most other software developers out there.

Remember not to get carried away with what is advertised. All these advertisements are written by marketing folk who, even though have product knowledge, are just trying to get their job done and will say wonders to brainwash you into thinking that what they offer is the best available.

And don’t get me wrong, I’m not trying to single out Adobe. This bitch session of mine applies for all the idiots out there, especially the “Steve Jobs is God” lemmings.